Can I get a wish-list?

It’s no secret that I love my audio books. I am a multiple-format reader, but due to personal space, my paper copies are regulated to my stuff,  gifts, hardcovers I’m already collecting (yes, I’m the nut with every Stephen King original trade hardcover), and treasured works from people I (kinda) know. Everything else, I have either in digital or on audio.

Every month with my subscription to Audible, I get a download of anything I want.  In the past year, I’ve been introduced to Dan Wells, Kathy Reichs, Dennis Lehane, Steig Larsson, Justin Cronin (an excellent recommendation)and F. Paul Wilson.  All were new voices (to me) to take me away while driving or knitting or when I ned to drown out chatter at work.  I love discovering new voices.

So with the new year (and I do have a post about the glory of 2011), I’d like some recommendations for books – novels, collections, anthologies. I’m partial to Thrillers, Horror, and the occasional Science Fiction. I’m sorry, but I have to pass on Romantic Thrillers, Romances, Horrotica, basically any novel where the protagonist falls into bed with someone after lustily spending the previous 50 pages talking about falling into bed with someone. I’m burned (burnt?) out on those.

 It doesn’t matter in what format you’ve read them, a good book is a good book. I’ll this them in to To Be Read list with a hat-tip on Goodreads and here, and every book I’ll give a proper review.  Every book. Because 2011 will be a year of my words, and God help us all because RIGHT NOW I am motivated.

To this end, I am also available for ARCs and eARCs. This blog gets her fair share of hits and I’d like to spread the word about your freshly polished baby.

Tell me what I’ve missed. Tell me everything.

Gimme.

 

2 thoughts on “Can I get a wish-list?

  1. The best book I read last year, The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. It is the first of a fantasy trilogy, with the second scheduled to be published in a few months. I admire Rothfuss’ succinctly efficient descriptions.

    The first few sentences:

    It was night again. The Waystone Inn lay in silence, and it was a silence of three parts. The first part was a hollow, echoing quiet, made by things that were lacking. If there were horses stabled in the barn they would have stamped and champed and broken it to pieces. If there had been a crowd of guests, even a handful of guests bedded down for the night, their restless breathing and mingled snores would have gently thawed the silence like a warm spring wind.