Is There A Seamsperson In The House (Picture Post)

(there are probably more than a few seamspeople, but I wanted to throw as wide a net as possible)

This is my Dad.

Dad and kids - Detroit Edition
Dad and kids – Detroit Edition

He retired from the Detroit Police Force in 1996.

Death Stare, patent pending
Death Stare, patent pending

I wear this badge I pilfered from my mother’s jewelry box many years ago. It has his badge number.

Badge 2414 and DPD Police Box Key
Badge 2414 and DPD Police Box Key

My dad used to wear this jacket and then he gave it to me. You’ll pardon me when I say it’s beat to hell, but it’s true. Doug and I have different reasons for wanting to keep it (you probably won’t even have to ask him twice to tell you the Story), and Doug wears it mostly, but when I look at it I think of my dad.

I just want a new lining put into it and the seams and cuffs cleaned up. I don’t want it to look like new, I just don’t want to lose my keys and loose change in the lining of the pockets. The first few tailors I visited said it wasn’t worth their time. When I was finally able to get a price (what I though was reasonable for materials and time), the gentleman told me I would be better off just cutting off the D and sewing it onto another jacket. Then I could pitch the rest.

That broke my heart and I left.

This is my dad’s jacket.  I can see him wearing it when he drove me down to college, when visited me in my dorm room, stopped by my first apartment.

Is there someone out there that can put a lining in my dad’s jacket, clean up the cuffs and repair the frayed seams. It doesn’t have to be perfect, just wearable. Please send me an email or comment here and quote me a price.

We don’t just cut and sew the parts of memories we think are worth saving.

Easter 197*coff*5*coff*
Easter 197*coff*5*coff*

4 thoughts on “Is There A Seamsperson In The House (Picture Post)

  1. My significant other, Pam, who sews said: because the material does not have a “tooth to it” that repairing the attachment points near the ribbing would best be done by shortening the material and re-attaching the repaired cuffs and waist, this would make the sleeves as well as the length shorter, however, and that is something we suspect you would not want.

    As a back-up plan, she said that you might consider removing the lining, placing the shell over a hoodie and then tacking the shell to the hoodie in many key places, which would then extend the life of the jacket by lifting its weight off the worn out lining and seams and permitting the hoodie to take the brunt of future wear.

    I asked her if she would be willing to tackle the task. She replied negatively, in that the hours of hand stitching the silk sateen material will invariably impart a “repaired look” (around the pockets especially) which potentially could make you much less pleased with the jacket than you currently are.

    Sorry this is just another recommendation and not a nibble. I think the risk of damaging a keepsake is too daunting for her to even make an offer.

    1. For me, no matter what gets done, it will look repaired, which is infinitely better than ratty, which is where it is now.

      I was even thinking orange sateen patches for the parts that are nearly irreparable. It will never look like new, I never expected it to, but it’s like my favorite Pink Panther doll – all of the stitches and patches remind me of how much it’s loved.