Walter’s Lab Notes

I’m *Fringe* watcher. 

I don’t get all of the symbols but I like my shows with paranoid intrigue.  I hate that I knit when I watch because I miss the subtle clues in the background.  Walter is m y favorite character.  He’s so delightfully random which makes him interesting and a little dangerous.

Today I discovered that Walter’s lab notes from each case are posted as photographs online.  They give a little insight into how his mind works as well as his past and his general temperment.  This is a strange new world for him, and all he has is his personality and his brains.  Sometimes they aren’t enough when dealing with Peter and forces that want to send him back.  It’s a little sad.

I’m going to try to get them all down, since they are just photos and I’m not taking my fannish ways to another forum where I’ll just get violent.    I’ll just place them here to be admired and even discussed. 

These will be out of order:

– Project 1051 – Exploration 1 –

Autum has arrived, and the whole city is in a funk because the Red Sox failed to make the series.  Astonishing. Whence this strange expectation? During my 17 years in captivity, did we enter some alternate reality in which the Sox are a viable team?

It was always this time of year that the orderlies would propose a ballgame, staff versus inmates.  The orderlies insisted upon their three strikes per out, three outs per half-inning, seven or nine innings per game.  The inmates played along, knowing that the line of scrimmage ran from home through the mound to third, that wickets could trip unwary outfielders, and that every strike guaranteed another frame.  The game ended when the score was Q to 12.

The orderlies could never crack the secret of Dashiell’s quantum knuckleball.  The batters were unable to determine its position and momentum at once! Unable to bear it, they recommended shock therapy for the poor fellow.  In cofindence, Dash confessed to  me that it was a cheat: after all, the direction of the ball’s hop was determined after the batter had chosen to swing! True, there may exist parallel timelines in which every swing connected — in which they made line drives and smacked home ruins and even drove the balls’ cork nuclei from their leathery kins — but we do not live in them.

Speaking of nuclei, those in the young woman’s bloodstream are shedding electrons and antineutrinos as we speak.  Soon she were perform her Darryl revok routine.  Stains on the carpet and stains on the scenery, unless we can forge an antidote, a bonding agent, a Zephyrus for the Hyacinth.  Wait!  Hyacinth!  That’s it!

–Episode 1×06 The Cure, Fringe

 

4 thoughts on “Walter’s Lab Notes

  1. I LOVE me the Walter. I could careless for the other characters as long as I get Walter.

    I have a sneaking suspicion that Peter is actually a clone of Walter and one of Walter’s “storage units” for information.

    JDC

  2. I know, as I write, that I may be perceived as stupid to ask this question (or any question about any JJ Abrams) but, here goes: What is the deal with Mark Valley’s character? I’ve not seen every episode, but is he dead or alive or imaginary or ex-rogue or … yeaaa. Well. I don’t want to go on some board and become one of those people, but since you’re a fan, maybe you can shine some candlelight in my dark valley.

  3. Agent John Scott was in an explosion in the pilot which caused his body to decay and liquify. In order to find out what was killing him, Olivia linked minds with him via a machine created by Walter. After the big reveal, John was killed in the field, so Olivia believes him dead. Instead, in the last frames we see him wheeled into the basement of Massive Dynamic where the orderly is told by Nina to question him.

    I don’t believe he’s dead, but exists in a state pf suspended animation, and because he and Olivia shared a link, he remains in contact with her telepathically. Olivia of course thinks he’s dead and she’s possibly going nuts.